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Sample Activity from our New Second Grade

Sample Activity from our New Second Grade

This fall (September 2019) ShalomLearning will offer three new levels of our values-based curriculum (K-2).  Similar to grades 3-7, our lessons tie in Biblical stories, prayers, and other Jewish text to a value. In addition, for these grades, we focus on art and literature.

Here’s a sample activity from our Ba’al Tashchit unit for second grade. Keep in mind, this is just one piece of a larger lesson plan.

Sample Activity

 

בַּל תַּשְׁחִית

Ba’al Tashchit-Don’t Waste

ShalomLearning: Grade 2

 

From ט”ו בִּשְׁבָט  Tu B’Shevat To בַּל תַּשְׁחִית Ba’al Tashchit – Don’t Waste


Values in Art: Hanoch Piven and Recycled Art
40 minutes total (can be broken into two twenty-minute sessions)
Supplies:
Scrap paper for the students to brainstorm their portraits
Construction paper
Glue
Crayons
Scissors
Clean recycled / found objects (lids, game pieces, figures, old cards, etc.)
Magazines (to cut up)

Last week we learned about ט”ו בִּשְׁבָט Tu B’Shevat, the holiday where we celebrate trees. So, it makes perfect sense that this week we’re going to take that love of nature just one step further and explore a key Jewish value: בַּל תַּשְׁחִית Ba’al Tashchit Don’t Waste. בַּל תַּשְׁחִית Ba’al Tashchit Don’t Waste is the idea that we are responsible for how we interact with the world around us and our impact on the environment.

What are some of the ways that you know that we can have an impact on the world? Brainstorm a list, including creating trash, recycling, driving a car, using disposable items instead of reusable. Be sure the students identify that you can recycle items and reuse them.

We have identified that there are many ways we impact the environment, in good ways and not-so-good ways. We’re going to focus on some of the ways we can improve our impact.

Together, let’s make a list of ideas of ways that follow the ideals of בַּל תַּשְׁחִית  Ba’al Tashchit Don’t Waste. I’ve given one idea for each category, to get you started, but let’s see what else we can do, both here and at home.
Reduce:
Use reusable plates / cups
Reuse:
Turn plastic jugs or cans into planters
Recycle:
Make sure all paper and cardboard get into a recycling bin!

 

If possible, come up with specific ideas for things that the students can implement – things like making sure all the paper gets cleaned up from your classroom and put into the recycling bin. If your synagogue (or other location) doesn’t have ample recycling bins, perhaps you can make a new one! If you have access to outdoor or window space, you could plan a future project to create planters.

One creative way to reuse a variety of objects is to create new art from it! Hanoch Piven, a famous Israeli artist, does just that. He creates portraits of famous people from across the globe. Let’s look at a few of the portraits he has made from the website Piven World http://www.pivenworld.com/hanoch-piven-illustrations.

Show students a variety of portraits of figures they will recognize from the website. As you view them, point out a few of the objects used to add meaning to the portrait. For example, for Obama he uses Statue of Liberty models for the eyes.

Not all of Hanoch Piven’s art features particular people, sometimes he just creates.  See other pieces here: http://www.pivenworld.com/hanoch-piven-illustrations/art-for-kids/11

Today, you’re going to create your own Piven-style art! To get started, the first thing is to identify who you’d like to portray and come up with 4-5 attributes of the person, so you can include them in the portrait.  For example, if you picked Moses, you might note that he spoke to a burning bush, he had a speech impediment, he held the 10 commandments tablets, he split the red sea, and he lived in the desert!

When you have your list, think about ways you could represent some of these ideas on your picture. For example, you could use fire or a bush to represent the burning bush. You could color his robe a speckled tan color to look like desert.

Encourage the kids to help each other with their brainstorming. You can bring back the idea of “זוּג – zug – pair” from week 13 and encourage them to work in partners.

Students will work at a variety of paces, so it is recommended that you pause once you feel like everyone has picked a person and started brainstorming attributes. You will take  more work time later on to create the actual portraits – and suggestions for what to do with those students who create quickly.

Provide a second block of time for students to work on their portraits. Encourage students to include any objects they can find – and to draw or cut out pictures of items that wouldn’t work to include directly (like a banana!).

Some ideas for students who complete their work more quickly than the rest:

  • Create explanation cards for each portrait, interviewing other students to learn about the symbolism they included. 
  • Work together to create another image for an imagined character.

 

Shana Tova Letter

Shana Tova Letter

Shalom Chaverim,

Shana Tova! I hope everyone had a wonderful summer. The school year is well underway for many and just getting started for others. We had a very busy summer here at ShalomLearning: training teachers (with now over 600 registered in our growing community of practice) and checking in with all of our partner sites (at almost 100 synagogues reaching 5000 students) to ensure everyone has the tools,  resources, and support needed to be successful in and beyond the classroom.

We’re still glowing from the impact of our training sessions at NewCAJE in Hartford, and from our training days in Chicago, Davie, Rockville, and Los Angeles. We’ve heard wonderful feedback from these sessions as well from the webinars. We’re constantly impressed by the ideas and visions for the future of Jewish education shared in these workshops and are very proud of the growing supportive culture within the ShalomLearning community.

But don’t just follow my opinion. (I love the work that we do!)  The Cohen Center for Modern Jewish Studies at Brandeis University, has just released the first study of its kind, evaluating the past two years of our program. It has been an incredibly exciting journey to innovate in Jewish Supplementary School Education (its what we do) – something long forgotten by much of the Jewish philanthropic world. Once upon a time, and not long ago, too many Jewish families dismissed Hebrew School as mediocre at best and inaccessible and irrelevant in their busy lives. We work tirelessly to ensure 21st century Jewish education doesn’t make the same mistakes of the last 50 years. But, you can access the full report online here.

I hope our curriculum’s value of “Teshuvah” is a growing term of relevance in yours lives as we are in the Ten “Days of Awe” between Rosh Hashana and Yom Kippur. This is the time to reflect on how you can “return” to our best selves, your loved ones, and your Creator.

At ShalomLearning, we take this time to not only enter our own introspection, but also on how we can improve as an organization.

One of our team’s greatest strengths comes from listening to feedback and channeling that information to find ways to improve.

I look forward to another year of working together with all of you in the ShalomLearning community to continue to make Jewish education more accessible and engaging for everyone.

Shana Tova,

Josh

 

Understanding Tisha B’Av

Understanding Tisha B’Av

Tisha B’Av, literally the ninth day of the month of Av, begins this year the evening of Saturday, July 21st. Its observance is frequently overlooked because it falls in the middle of the summer. If, like many people, you know very little about this holiday, here is a good background from MyJewishLearning.

On Tisha B’Av, it is traditional to read Megillat Eicha(Book of Lamentations). Here is a brief explanation of its contents. Eicha is chanted to a unique trope (melody). You can hear it here.

We also suggest watching this video from Aleph Beta that explains how to keep this holiday relevant.

As a day of mourning, it’s customary to fast on Tisha B’Av. In addition, one should refrain from eating meat (except on Shabbat) for the nine days leading up to Tisha B’Av. Check out all of the meatless recipes from the Joy of Kosher to make meal planning easier.

Celebrating Shavuot 2018

Celebrating Shavuot 2018

This year, Shavuot begins the Saturday evening May 19.  ReformJudaism.org provides a great basic summary of the holiday.

It is a tradition in some communities for people to stay up all night studying.  Here is an explanation of the custom from My Jewish Learning.

If staying up all night is not your thing, how about reading the Book of Ruth on Shavuot? Here is a video from Aleph Beta explaining why we read this text on this holiday.

Shavuot is unique among the Jewish holidays in that instead of eating chicken or brisket, it is traditional to have dairy foods for Shavuot.  There are actually many different reasons given for this custom. Here are a few from Chabad.

Two of the most popular dairy foods are blintzes and cheese cake.  Here is a recipe for blintzes from Tori Avery and one for ‘Oreo Experience Cheesecake’ from Joy of Kosher.

Chag Shavuot Sameach – however you celebrate!

 

 

CEO Message on Koach Hadibbur

CEO Message on Koach Hadibbur

Dear Friends,

We are just days away from Passover, so I hope you find this letter as a welcome break from the chores of preparing for this holiday.

Now in our 6th Jewish value unit, our students are currently studying, Koach Hadibbur, the power of words. There could not be a better time for them to explore the Jewish roots in this value.

Koach Hadibbur: The Power of Words from ShalomLearning on Vimeo.

As we saw in this past weekend’s “March for Our Lives,” words matter. Words can hurt but words can also heal. With words, we can gather people, we can take a stand, and we can make change. The next generation is learning how to use their words to fight for what they believe in. It’s not just about making your point, but making your goals clear in a way others will listen.  And listening to those on the other side. A lot easier said (or heard) then done.

We keep Koach Hadibbur in mind as we plan our professional development. As you will see in this month’s newsletter, we have scheduled our Summer Training Conferences where we will help our educators prepare for the fall and provide opportunities for our educators to share experiences.  It’s through these conversations we all improve and build community.

We are excited to be able to sponsor ShalomLearning educators’ attendance at this summer’s NewCAJE9 conference. It’s a wonderful experience to grow, learn, and build together.

I hope you have a wonderful Pesach.  Chag kasher v’sameach.

Gratefully yours,

Joshua